Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 23rd International Conference on Global Nursing Education & Research Tokyo, Japan .

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Anny Dionne

Miami Regional College/Aspen University, USA

Keynote: Cultural competency in nursing education: Achieving excellence and overcoming the obstacles

Time : 09:30-10:30

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anny Dionne photo
Biography:

Anny Dionne is a native French-Canadian Emergency Room Leader and a Nurse Educator. She has been a Nurse for 15 years. She received her Associate in Nursing from Quebec in 2003 and migrated to the United States in 2005 where she learned Spanish. In addition to teaching herself English after migrating to the United States, she learned to speak and write Spanish in order to meet the needs for her patients and employees in a hospital in Miami, Florida. In 2013, she decided to overcome her fears of going back to school since she had never attended university in English. In 2016, she graduated from Aspen University with a Master’s in Nursing Education and in 2018 from Chamberlain College of Nursing with a Doctorate in Healthcare Systems Leadership. She has taught in various universities including a graduate dual language program (English/Spanish). She currently teaches at Aspen University and has built a graduate program tailored for students with English as a second language at Miami Regional College.

 

Abstract:

Background: The change in the mode of communication and traveling gave birth to the concept of cultural competency; cultural competency is defined as the ability to interact effectively with individuals from different cultures. While competent cultural care is vital to nurses working in any healthcare setting, it is often forgotten in nursing academia, yet the nursing profession encompasses nurses from various background.

Aim: The purpose of this study is to discuss methods used to design a culturally sensitive and competent graduate program to meet the needs of predominate foreign students that were enrolled.

Method: To create a culturally competent hybrid graduate program an evidence-based approach was used. The curriculum was designed to meet the needs of nurses/students who work and may have more than one job. The syllabi were developed using ACEN & SACS standards and the DNP Essentials. Also, graphics reflecting the theme of the weeks were added to the syllabi that correlate with the weeks of the Moodle Room online platform. Each student has a mentor that is doctorally prepared with English as a second language, who checks in on the student progress on a weekly basis. Software such as Turnitin and Grammarly were made available to the DNP students. Professors teaching in the graduate program were trained in teaching culturally diverse students.

Results: The results showed significant improvement in the students’ quality of work when compared to the curriculum that was not cultural sensitive and competently designed.

Conclusion: These findings support the need to incorporate cultural sensitivity and competency in nursing education. While the results were favorable, further research is needed in this area.

Implications: According to the Institute of Medicine recommendations, more emphasis should be placed on increasing the number of doctoral prepared nurses; building a program that is culturally sensitive will allow more nurses the opportunity to overcome the obstacles and fears that prevent them from seeking an advanced degree while increasing the number of nurses with a doctoral degree by 2020.

Keynote Forum

Laurie Glick

JCT Lev Academic Center, Israel

Keynote: Creative “caringmodel

Time : 10:30-11:30

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Laurie Glick photo
Biography:

Laurie Glick has earned her Doctoral degree in Nursing and MSN at Case Western Reserve University, USA and a MPH, BSN degrees from Hebrew University, Israel. She has served as the Nursing Director, Assistant Dean and Lecturer at the School of Life and Health Sciences, Lev Academic Center, Department of Nursing in Israel.

 

Abstract:

From the time it was established, the nursing school of the Lev Academic Center has experienced an extraordinary growth of student population from 39 students in 2007 to over 1,000 students in 2018. The national Ministry of Health rated the school number one for the highest grades its students achieved on the national nursing boards and for increasing the number of the nursing students in the country. This success can be attributed to the "Caring Model for Lev Nursing Students", unique to the school. The entire faculty of the nursing school is involved not only in the academic education but also in supporting each individual student, many of whom are young mothers, coping with major family and financial problems. Components of this caring model include: Empathetic listening, consideration of personal problems, tutoring, financial aid and a faculty open door policy. The focus of this research was to identify the students' perception of the caring factors that contributed to their completion and success in the nursing program. The study population included fourth year students and graduates from the past two years. Two questionnaires were used for this purpose. The NSPIC and a questionnaire that was created based on the caring model that we developed. The importance of this research is to understand from the students' perspectives the specific characteristics that empowered them. The holistic approach of this caring model can contribute to the confidence and resilience of the students in nursing school environments in both developed and developing countries and can serve as a model to create a successful student population and increase enrollment.

Keynote Forum

Orly Jakubowitz

Jerusalem College of Technology-Lev Academic Center, Israel

Keynote: Creative caring model: A students' perception of faculty contribution to their success in nursing education

Time : 10:30-11:30

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Orly Jakubowitz photo
Biography:

Mrs. Orly Jakubowitz has a BSN from Hebrew University and an MHA from Clark University, Israel. She lectures on quality assurance, risk management, and case management at Academic Lev Center. Currently, coordinating a comprehensive review course for the Israel National Nursing Boards. Simultaneously serving as the program director for ultra-orthodox nursing students. Her clinical work experience includes nursing in the department of surgery at the Hadassah Medical Center and the director of nursing in a geriatric hospital for Alzheimer patients. She was a clinical instructor for geriatric and surgical nursing students.

Abstract:

From the time it was established, the nursing school of the Lev Academic Center has experienced an extraordinary growth of student population from 39 students in 2007 to over 1,000 students in 2018. The national Ministry of Health rated the school number one for the highest grades its students achieved on the national nursing boards and for increasing the number of the nursing students in the country. This success can be attributed to the "Caring Model for Lev Nursing Students", unique to the school. The entire faculty of the nursing school is involved not only in the academic education but also in supporting each individual student, many of whom are young mothers, coping with major family and financial problems. Components of this caring model include: Empathetic listening, consideration of personal problems, tutoring, financial aid and a faculty open door policy. The focus of this research was to identify the students' perception of the caring factors that contributed to their completion and success in the nursing program. The study population included fourth year students and graduates from the past two years. Two questionnaires were used for this purpose. The NSPIC and a questionnaire that was created based on the caring model that we developed. The importance of this research is to understand from the students' perspectives the specific characteristics that empowered them. The holistic approach of this caring model can contribute to the confidence and resilience of the students in nursing school environments in both developed and developing countries and can serve as a model to create a successful student population and increase enrollment.

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jawaher Bin Jumah photo
Biography:

Master graduated in nursing education from the University of Central Florida, an internship supervisor of undergraduate students, and as a faculty member in The College of Nursing at King Saud University. Currently, he is a PhD alumni from Barry University in nursing administration who is interested in conducting nursing researches and teaching as well to advance nursing science. He certified simulation instructor from Harvard University.

 

Abstract:

Background: Simulation is an instructional method that has an imitation or imaginary
experience that reflects real-life situations, but without jeopardy. Simulation use in nursing education can be a cost containment advantage requiring less clinical placement, higher quality patient care, and learners ready for patient care with technology. The use of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) as a teaching strategy may help to bridge the gap of clinical settings and faculty shortage in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a statistically significant variation of a HFS intervention and lecture versus lecture only on Saudi Arabian senior nursing students’ knowledge and self-confidence.
Theoretical framework: The selected framework to guide this study was the Experiential Learning Theory (ELT) by David Kolb.

Methods: A quasi-experimental pre/posttest quantitative design was utilized in this study to determine the effect of high-fidelity simulation and lecture on knowledge and self- confidence Saudi Arabian senior nursing student. Data was collected from a convenience sample of 120 senior nursing students enrolled in the critical care course from Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University in Saudi Arabia. The data was analyzed using the Independent-samples t-test to measure the mean differences in knowledge (dependent variable) between two groups. A paired t-test test was applied to measure self-confidence. Pearson’s r was used to measure the relationship between variables in two different groups.

Results: The results indicated that the knowledge acquisition of nursing students who have received high fidelity simulation and lecture scored higher than nursing students who received lecture only. The findings also suggest that the application of high-fidelity simulation and lecture as a teaching strategy have more effect on self-confidence rather than application of lecture only. Additionally, the results showed that there was a positive correlation between the two variables; knowledge acquisition and self-confidence, r = 0.98, n = 60, p = 0.003

Conclusion: Providing Saudi Arabia nursing students an opportunity to use high-fidelity simulation supplemental to clinical experiences, students can gain much needed clinical practice experiences. This will improve the quality of healthcare quality while practicing nursing skills in a safe environment.

Keynote Forum

Irfan Tifeku

Fizioterapia Medical Clinic, Kosovo

Keynote: Osteopathic Manipulation and Physiotherapeutic Treatment in Somatic Tinnitus

Time : 12:50-13:50

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Irfan Tifeku photo
Biography:

Irfan Tifeku has completed his Master of Science in Physiotherapy from University of Medicine in Tirana. He is the Director of the clinic Fizioterapia, a private clinic of the physiotherapy in Prishtina, Kosovo. He has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals and has been part of different conferences and congresses in Kosovo, Albania and abroad in Europe. He has been for two years assistant professor of Kinesiology in the University of Tetovo, in Macedonia. He is specialized in the branch of osteopathy and ultrasound.

Abstract:

Tinnitus is the ringing in the ears heard by the patients in the absence of external sounds. The potential causes for the tinnitus could be the vascular, temporal bone dysfunction, inflammation in the ear, idiopathic, muscular spasms of the middle ear and palatal muscles, functional impairment of the eustachian tube, functional disorders of the jaw, and cervical spine.

In some individuals, tinnitus can be modulated by specific maneuvers of the temporomandibular joint, head and neck, eyes, and limbs. Neuro-plasticity seems to play a central role in this capacity for modulation, suggesting that abnormal interactions between the sensory modalities, sensorimotor systems, and neuro-cognitive and neuro-emotional networks may contribute to the development of somato-sensory tinnitus.

Current evidence supports a link between somatic disorders and higher modulation of tinnitus, especially in patients with a normal hearing threshold. Patients with tinnitus who have somatic disorders seems to have a higher chance of modulating their tinnitus with somatic maneuvers; consistent improvements in tinnitus symptoms have been observed in patients with temporomandibular joint disease following targeted therapy for temporomandibular disorders.

Tinnitus is a very common symptom that often causes distress and decreases the patient's quality of life. Apart from the well-known causes, tinnitus can in some cases be elicited by dysfunctions of the cervical spine or the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). To date however, it is unclear whether alleviation of these dysfunctions, by physical therapy treatment, also decreases the tinnitus complaints. Such physical therapy and osteopathic manipulation could be an interesting treatment option for patients that are now often left without treatment.

Keynote Forum

Dario Furnari

University of Exeter, UK

Keynote: Pen vs. Computer: How to write by hand improves memory and creativity

Time : 14:50-15:50

Nursing Education Summit  2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dario Furnari photo
Biography:

Dario Furnari is Ph.D. in Applied Biomedical Sciences in the neuroscience and traumatology and neuropharmacology sector.

Abstract:

The pen is one of the many channels for transforming thoughts into written words. Handwriting acts as a "memory propeller". For example, when you are at the supermarket, the simple act of writing keeps the products you really need in your mind; or when someone at school was a shrewd knows that very often there was no need to use the sheets prepared before a class assignment to copy because they remembered everything that was written. This memory would have failed if the ticket to copy had been written or better typed on the keyboard. The latter characterizes the work of many people and yet, even today, children make their first experiences of writing with a pen or pencil. But is it really out of fashion? Today we have the opportunity to write our thoughts in other ways, "keyboard, tablet, touch screen", and even the signature, once the test par excellence of our identity, is faced with the competition of our "Fingerprints". Indeed, in some American schools the writing, replaced by the PC, is no longer included in the didactic plans; according to some scientists and promoters of this event, this method would facilitate children's learning and improve creativity.

So, what can we do? Fortunately, we come to the real "scientific research" based on real scientific protocols for the progress of science and not for some advertising promotion.

A team of researchers coordinated by the Psychologist Sandra Sulzenbruck of the Leibniz Institute in Dortmund hypothesizes that handwriting facilitates and stimulates "fine motor skills". The research consists of a comparison with some right-handed people who write a lot with the keyboard and other right-handed people who instead make much use of paper and pen. Both groups were asked to carry out a battery of skill tests, changing the use of the hand.

Research has shown that "technology" takes longer to do the exercises but only when they use the right; it is evident that these individuals are not used to a precise coordination of movements.

The most serious effect, however, concerns above all the cognitive sphere. According to the French neuro-scientist Marieke Longcam, both children and adults find it easier to learn new signs of writing, or a new language, when they reproduce them "by hand" instead of the PC.

During the experiment some participants practiced writing the letters by hand, the others with a special keyboard. After the trial, after several weeks, the researchers verified the successes of learning; result: those who had written freehand were much better, as they were able to distinguish with greater precision the graphic gestures, learned in the previous lesson, from other similar but reversed characters.

In our alphabet the reversed letters are the "b - d - p - q"; and it is precisely on these letters that children encounter their own difficulties especially if they are dyslexic. Also write these letters to one keyboard does not change anything from the motor point of view; since every graphic sign, for example take the "s", has a particular movement of the body, different from the act of typing on a keyboard.

From the neurophysiological point of view, using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) it is possible to visualize the graphs of brain activity.

Still in the experiment, each participant who had tried to write graphic signs by hand, had memorized certain movements associated with each graph-motor sign. When they tried to remember, the tomograph showed an increase in neuronal activity in the left Broca area, in the anterior intraparietal area and in the left premotor dorsal cortex; all areas dedicated to the mental development of an action. Thus, increased motor involvement implies better "synaptic plasticity" on learning, a more stable connection in memory and a better repetition of information.